Germany says uncertain where 130,000 registered migrants are?

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Germany says uncertain where 130,000 registered migrants are?

Migrants wait for the start of the rights education lessons for refugees and asylum seekers in a hall of the "Bayernkaserne" in Munich, southern Germany on February 24, 2016
Migrants wait for the start of the rights education lessons for refugees and asylum seekers in a hall of the “Bayernkaserne” in Munich, southern Germany on February 24, 2016 (AFP Photo/Christof Stache)

Berlin (AFP) – German authorities do not know the whereabouts of 130,000 asylum seekers, the government said in a parliamentary document seen by AFP on Friday.

Out of some 1.1 million asylum seekers registered in 2015, “about 13 percent did not turn up at the reception centres to which they had been directed,” the government said in a written reply to a question from a lawmaker of the Left Party.

Some may have returned to their home countries, travelled on to another country, or gone underground, it said, adding that there may also have been repeated registrations of the same individual.

A spokesman for the interior ministry said a package of new measures approved by parliament on Thursday is expected to help address the problem.

These include plans for an identity document to be issued upon the arrival of a migrant, which would allow authorities to store personal data under a common database and thereby help to avoid repeated registrations.

The new rules, which includes restricting family reunions for some migrants, also lower the hurdles for the expulsion of convicted foreigners — a key measure proposed after the New Year’s rampage in Cologne, where hundreds of women reported being sexually assaulted and robbed in a crowd of mostly migrant men.

Missing Refugees In Germany Is An Army In Waiting



  • About 13 percent of all refugees who have officially entered Germany in 2015 have gone missing.
  • Germany has officially welcomed as many as 1.1 refugees into their country and they suspect that over 400 thousand are undocumented and untraceable. 
  • Germany has tried to send them back to their host countries, but so far has been largely unsuccessful.
  • This poses a huge risk for all of Europe, both from a terrorist standpoint and an economic one.

Some 13 percent of all migrants who officially entered Germany in 2015 never turned up at the accommodation provided for them, Süddeutsche Zeitung reported Thursday. The news comes as Berlin tightens laws on asylum seekers.

The newspaper’s report is based on Germany’s Federal Interior Ministry’s official response to a request filed by the Left Party. The ministry provided two explanations for the phenomenon: the refugees either continued their journey to another European country or choose to live illegally within Germany.

According to Frank-Jürgen Weise, the head of Germany’s Federal Office for Migration (BAMF), there are as many as 400,000 asylum seekers within the country who have no ID documents and German authorities have proven unable to identify them, the head of the BAMF agency said in Berlin on Thursday.

Last year, Berlin was unable to expel all illegal aliens to the country responsible for them, which according to the Dublin Regulation is the EU state a refugee first entered.

Only one in 10 asylum seekers was returned to the country from which they entered Germany, and in 2014 it was one in five refugees.

The reluctance of other European states to take back the refugees is understandable: Greece alone has witnessed a 21-fold growth in immigrants in one year.

Out of the total of 45,000 so-called “takeover requests,” Germany filed to other states in 2015, only about 3,600 have been completed. At the same time, other EU states have “returned” to Germany some 3,000 asylum seekers, thus making the number of refugees that German authorities managed to distribute to other European states to mere 600, a tiny drop in the ocean of migrants that poured into Germany last year.

Germany has welcomed an estimated 1.1 million refugees in 2015, mostly from the Middle East and Northern Africa, of which about a half are either without official documents or have disappeared.

On Thursday, the Bundestag adopted new legislation, tightening asylum regulations. On Friday, German upper house of parliament, the Bundesrat, is set to hold a final vote on legislation aimed at making the influx of migrants more manageable.

The new laws would facilitate deportation in the event that Germany does not recognize an asylum claim. The rules for family unification are going to be stricter, too, with asylum seekers now having to live two years in Germany before being given the right to invite their family members to join them.